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Phil Spector Back To Mono (4CD Box) [EAC FLAC] [RePoPo]

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Phil Spector Back To Mono (4CD Box) [EAC FLAC] [RePoPo]

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Name:Phil Spector Back To Mono (4CD Box) [EAC FLAC] [RePoPo]

Total Size: 924.79 MB

Magnet: Magnet Link

Seeds: 4

Leechers: 0

Stream: Watch Online @ Movie4u

Last Updated: 2015-09-19 04:34:27 (Update Now)

Torrent added: 2009-08-28 13:21:39




Torrent Files List


CD1 (Size: 910.77 MB) (Files: 104)

 CD1

  01.- The Teddy Bears - To Know Him Is To Love Him.flac

10.53 MB

  02.- Ray Paterson - Corrine, Corrina.flac

12.20 MB

  03.- Ben E. King - Spanish Harlem.flac

11.46 MB

  04.- Curtis Lee - Pretty Little Angle Eyes.flac

11.67 MB

  05.- Gene Pitney - Every Breath I Take.flac

12.45 MB

  06.- The Paris Sisters - I Love How You Love Me.flac

8.04 MB

  07.- Curtis Lee - Under The Moon Of Love.flac

12.95 MB

  08.- The Crystals - There's No Other Like My Baby.flac

9.91 MB

  09.- The Crystals - Uptown.flac

9.46 MB

  10.- The Crystals - He Hit Me (It Felt Like a Kiss).flac

10.38 MB

  11.- The Crystals - He's A Rebel.flac

9.83 MB

  12.- Bob B. Soxx & The Blue Jeans - Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah.flac

10.79 MB

  13.- The Alley Cats - Puddin' N' Tain.flac

11.36 MB

  14.- The Crystals - He's Sure The Boy I Love.flac

10.99 MB

  15.- Bob B. Soxx & The Blue Jeans - Why Do Lovers Break Each Others Hearts.flac

11.68 MB

  16.- Darlene Love - (Today I Met) The Boy I'm Gonna Marry.flac

11.62 MB

  17.- The Crystals - Da Doo Ron Ron.flac

9.42 MB

  18.- The Crystals - Heartbreaker.flac

10.74 MB

  19.- Veronica - Why Don't They Let Us Fall in Love.flac

11.39 MB

  20.- Darlene Love - Chapel of Love.flac

10.02 MB

  21.- Bob B. Soxx & The Blue Jeans - Not Too Young to Get Married.flac

10.00 MB

  22.- Darlene Love - Wait Til My Bobby Gets Home.flac

10.03 MB

  23.- The Crystals - All Grown Up.flac

11.22 MB

  Phil Spector Back to Mono (1958-1969) [disc 1].cue

4.32 KB

  Phil Spector Back to Mono (1958-1969) [disc 1].txt

1.73 KB

  Various - Phil Spector Back to Mono (1958-1969) [disc 1].log

8.57 KB

  Various - Phil Spector Back to Mono (1958-1969) [disc 1].m3u

2.32 KB

 CD2

  01.- The Ronettes - Be My Baby.flac

11.89 MB

  02.- The Crystals - Then He Kissed Me.flac

11.25 MB

  03.- Darlene Love - A Fine, Fine Boy.flac

12.14 MB

  04.- The Ronettes - Baby, I Love You.flac

12.24 MB

  05.- The Ronettes - I Wonder.flac

12.27 MB

  06.- The Crystals - Girls Can Tell.flac

13.16 MB

  07.- The Crystals - Little Boy.flac

12.89 MB

  08.- The Treasures - Hold Me Tight.flac

12.44 MB

  09.- The Ronettes - (The Best Part Of) Breakin' Up.flac

12.94 MB

  10.- The Ronettes - Soldier Baby of Mine.flac

11.85 MB

  11.- Darlene Love - Strange Love.flac

12.65 MB

  12.- Darlene Love - Stumble and Fall.flac

10.16 MB

  13.- The Ronettes - When I Saw You.flac

11.61 MB

  14.- Veronica - So Young.flac

11.09 MB

  15.- The Ronettes - Do I Love You.flac

12.00 MB

  16.- The Ronettes - Keep On Dancing.flac

11.50 MB

  17.- The Ronettes - You, Baby.flac

12.81 MB

  18.- The Ronettes - Woman in Love (With You).flac

13.07 MB

  19.- The Ronettes - Walking in the Rain.flac

14.44 MB

  Phil Spector Back to Mono (1958-1969) [disc 2].cue

3.31 KB

  Phil Spector Back to Mono (1958-1969) [disc 2].txt

1.02 KB

  Various - Phil Spector Back to Mono (1958-1969) [disc 2].log

6.76 KB

  Various - Phil Spector Back to Mono (1958-1969) [disc 2].m3u

1.60 KB

 CD3

  01.- The Righteous Brothers - You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'.flac

16.65 MB

  02.- The Ronettes - Born to Be Together.flac

12.69 MB

  03.- The Righteous Brothers - Just Once in My Life.flac

16.40 MB

  04.- The Righteous Brothers - Unchained Melody.flac

16.29 MB

  05.- The Ronettes - Is This What I Get for Loving You^.flac

14.74 MB

  06.- Darlene Love - Long Way to Be Happy.flac

13.40 MB

  07.- The Righteous Brothers - (I Love You) For Sentimental Reasons.flac

13.22 MB

  08.- The Righteous Brothers - Ebb Tide.flac

12.99 MB

  09.- The Modern Folk Quartet - This Could Be the Night.flac

12.18 MB

  10.- The Ronettes - Paradise.flac

15.86 MB

  11.- Ike & Tina Turner - River Deep-Mountain High.flac

17.17 MB

  12.- Ike & Tina Turner - I'll Never Need More Than This.flac

17.26 MB

  13.- Ike & Tina Turner - A Love Like Yours (Don't Come Knockin' Everyday).flac

13.03 MB

  14.- Ike & Tina Turner - Save the Last Dance For Me.flac

13.54 MB

  15.- The Ronettes - I Wish I Never Saw the Sunshine.flac

16.97 MB

  16.- The Ronettes - You Came, You Saw, You Conquered.flac

12.16 MB

  18.- The Checkmates - Love Is All I Have to Give.flac

18.80 MB

  Phil Spector Back to Mono (1958-1969) [disc 3].cue

3.71 KB

  Phil Spector- Back to Mono (1958-1969) [disc 3].txt

1.25 KB

  Various - Phil Spector Back to Mono (1958-1969) [disc 3].log

7.21 KB

  Various - Phil Spector Back to Mono (1958-1969) [disc 3].m3u

2.06 KB

 CD4 - A Christmas Gift For You

  01.- Darlene Love - White Christmas.flac

12.54 MB

  02.- The Ronettes - Frosty The Snowman.flac

10.78 MB

  03.- Bob B. Soxx & The Blue Jeans - The Bells Of St. Mary.flac

12.70 MB

  04.- The Crystals - Santa Claus Is Coming To Town.flac

15.50 MB

  05.- The Ronettes - Sleigh Ride.flac

13.96 MB

  06.- Darlene Love - Marshmallow World.flac

10.51 MB

  07.- The Ronettes - I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus.flac

12.58 MB

  08.- The Crystals - Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer.flac

11.72 MB

  09.- Darlene Love - Winter Wonderland.flac

10.33 MB

  10.- The Crystals - Parade Of The Wooden Soldiers.flac

14.29 MB

  11.- Darlene Love - Christmas ( Baby Please Come Home).flac

12.65 MB

  12.- Bob B. Soxx & The Blue Jeans - Here Comes Santa Claus.flac

9.92 MB

  13.- Phil Spector & Artists - Silent Night.flac

8.39 MB

  A Christmas Gift For You.cue

2.64 KB

  A Christmas Gift For You.txt

1.00 KB

  Various - A Christmas Gift For You.log

5.61 KB

  Various - A Christmas Gift For You.m3u

1.36 KB

 COVERS

  phil_spector_a_christmas_gift_for_you_retail_cd-back.jpg

3.17 MB

  phil_spector_a_christmas_gift_for_you_retail_cd-cd.jpg

386.47 KB

  phil_spector_a_christmas_gift_for_you_retail_cd-front.jpg

1.95 MB

  phil_spector_back_to_mono_1958_1969_cd1_1991_retail_cd-back.jpg

1.73 MB

  phil_spector_back_to_mono_1958_1969_cd1_1991_retail_cd-cd.jpg

710.16 KB

  phil_spector_back_to_mono_1958_1969_cd1_1991_retail_cd-front.jpg

1.06 MB

  phil_spector_back_to_mono_1958_1969_cd1_1991_retail_cd-inside.jpg

1.59 MB

  phil_spector_back_to_mono_1958_1969_cd2_1991_retail_cd-back.jpg

1.76 MB

  phil_spector_back_to_mono_1958_1969_cd2_1991_retail_cd-cd.jpg

652.26 KB

  phil_spector_back_to_mono_1958_1969_cd2_1991_retail_cd-front.jpg

1.01 MB

  phil_spector_back_to_mono_1958_1969_cd2_1991_retail_cd-inside.jpg

1.47 MB

  phil_spector_back_to_mono_1958_1969_cd3_1991_retail_cd-back.jpg

3.47 MB

  phil_spector_back_to_mono_1958_1969_cd3_1991_retail_cd-cd.jpg

391.12 KB

  phil_spector_back_to_mono_1958_1969_cd3_1991_retail_cd-front.jpg

1.58 MB

 Phil Spector - Back To Mono (4CD Box) [EAC-FLAC] [RePoPo].txt

61.44 KB

 Torrent downloaded from Demonoid.com.txt

0.05 KB
 

tracker

leech seeds
 

Torrent description

*******************************************************************************
Phil Spector - Back To Mono (1958-1969)
*******************************************************************************

CD: Phil Spector: Back to Mono (1958-1969) [disc 1]

01. The Teddy Bears / To Know Him Is To Love Him [0:02:24.15]
02. Ray Paterson / Corrine, Corrina [0:02:41.20]
03. Ben E. King / Spanish Harlem [0:02:52.57]
04. Curtis Lee / Pretty Little Angle Eyes [0:02:46.45]
05. Gene Pitney / Every Breath I Take [0:02:45.45]
06. The Paris Sisters / I Love How You Love Me [0:02:07.50]
07. Curtis Lee / Under The Moon Of Love [0:02:52.40]
08. The Crystals / There's No Other Like My Baby [0:02:31.40]
09. The Crystals / Uptown [0:02:21.05]
10. The Crystals / He Hit Me (It Felt Like a Kiss) [0:02:33.70]
11. The Crystals / He's A Rebel [0:02:27.48]
12. Bob B. Soxx & The Blue Jeans / Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah [0:02:50.10]
13. The Alley Cats / Puddin' N' Tain [0:02:48.35]
14. The Crystals / He's Sure The Boy I Love [0:02:45.45]
15. Bob B. Soxx & The Blue Jeans / Why Do Lovers Break Each Others Hearts
[0:02:49.20]
16. Darlene Love / (Today I Met) The Boy I'm Gonna Marry [0:02:48.50]
17. The Crystals / Da Doo Ron Ron [0:02:18.00]
18. The Crystals / Heartbreaker [0:02:35.25]
19. Veronica / Why Don't They Let Us Fall in Love [0:02:40.00]
20. Darlene Love / Chapel of Love [0:02:25.47]
21. Bob B. Soxx & The Blue Jeans / Not Too Young to Get Married [0:02:28.05]
22. Darlene Love / Wait Til My Bobby Gets Home [0:02:23.58]
23. The Crystals / All Grown Up [0:02:49.17]



CD: Phil Spector: Back to Mono (1958-1969) [disc 2]

01. The Ronettes / Be My Baby [0:02:41.38]
02. The Crystals / Then He Kissed Me [0:02:37.12]
03. Darlene Love / A Fine, Fine Boy [0:02:48.25]
04. The Ronettes / Baby, I Love You [0:02:50.63]
05. The Ronettes / I Wonder [0:02:46.25]
06. The Crystals / Girls Can Tell [0:02:37.10]
07. The Crystals / Little Boy [0:03:00.02]
08. The Treasures / Hold Me Tight [0:02:54.23]
09. The Ronettes / (The Best Part Of) Breakin' Up [0:03:03.25]
10. The Ronettes / Soldier Baby of Mine [0:02:53.55]
11. Darlene Love / Strange Love [0:03:02.02]
12. Darlene Love / Stumble and Fall [0:02:24.43]
13. The Ronettes / When I Saw You [0:02:45.30]
14. Veronica / So Young [0:02:36.62]
15. The Ronettes / Do I Love You [0:02:52.00]
16. The Ronettes / Keep On Dancing [0:02:33.28]
17. The Ronettes / You, Baby [0:02:57.37]
18. The Ronettes / Woman in Love (With You) [0:02:57.28]
19. The Ronettes / Walking in the Rain [0:03:16.45]



CD: Phil Spector: Back to Mono (1958-1969) [disc 2]

01. The Righteous Brothers / You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin' [0:03:47.40]
02. The Ronettes / Born to Be Together [0:02:59.05]
03. The Righteous Brothers / Just Once in My Life [0:03:54.65]
04. The Righteous Brothers / Unchained Melody [0:03:38.15]
05. The Ronettes / Is This What I Get for Loving You^ [0:03:23.60]
06. Darlene Love / Long Way to Be Happy [0:02:48.22]
07. The Righteous Brothers / (I Love You) For Sentimental Reasons
[0:02:48.00]
08. The Righteous Brothers / Ebb Tide [0:02:49.73]
09. The Modern Folk Quartet / This Could Be the Night [0:02:40.70]
10. The Ronettes / Paradise [0:03:37.67]
11. Ike & Tina Turner / River Deep-Mountain High [0:03:37.58]
12. Ike & Tina Turner / I'll Never Need More Than This [0:03:27.12]
13. Ike & Tina Turner / A Love Like Yours (Don't Come Knockin' Everyday)
[0:02:58.15]
14. Ike & Tina Turner / Save the Last Dance For Me [0:02:47.23]
15. The Ronettes / I Wish I Never Saw the Sunshine [0:03:49.07]
16. The Ronettes / You Came, You Saw, You Conquered [0:02:49.63]
17. Sonny Charles & The Checkmates / Black Pearl [0:03:19.25]
18. The Checkmates / Love Is All I Have to Give [0:04:09.45]


CD4: A CHRISTMAS GIFT FOR YOU
YEAR: 1963

01. Darlene Love / White Christmas [0:02:56.65]
02. The Ronettes / Frosty The Snowman [0:02:20.53]
03. Bob B. Soxx & The Blue Jeans / The Bells Of St. Mary [0:02:58.70]
04. The Crystals / Santa Claus Is Coming To Town [0:03:28.20]
05. The Ronettes / Sleigh Ride [0:03:05.67]
06. Darlene Love / Marshmallow World [0:02:27.05]
07. The Ronettes / I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus [0:02:41.40]
08. The Crystals / Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer [0:02:34.40]
09. Darlene Love / Winter Wonderland [0:02:30.13]
10. The Crystals / Parade Of The Wooden Soldiers [0:02:58.62]
11. Darlene Love / Christmas ( Baby Please Come Home) [0:02:49.73]
12. Bob B. Soxx & The Blue Jeans / Here Comes Santa Claus [0:02:07.22]
13. Phil Spector & Artists / Silent Night [0:02:10.40]




-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
REVIEW
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Review by Stephen Thomas Erlewine

At the time Back to Mono was released in 1991, Phil Spector's reputation as one
of pop's great visionaries was intact, but there was no way to hear his genius.
It wasn't just that there were no collections spotlighting his productions,
there weren't collections of artists he produced. It wasn't until Back to Mono
that there was a thorough overview of Spector's greatest work, and while it's
not without flaws, it still stands as one of the great box sets. Some may
complain that there are no selections from his superstar '70s productions for
John Lennon, George Harrison, Leonard Cohen, and the Ramones, but that's for the
best, since their presence would have been incongruous, taking attention away
from the music that forms the heart of Spector's legacy. All of that music is
here, not just on the first three discs, all devoted to singles, but also on the
fourth disc, his seminal 1963 holiday album, A Christmas Gift for You, which
isn't just the greatest rock Christmas album, but a crystallization of his
skills. It could be argued that the song selection overlooks some obscure fan
favorites, such as "Do the Screw," but that's simply nitpicking, because what's
here are all the great Spector records, which were hardly just great
productions, they were great songs as well. As the set plays, it's hard not to
be stunned by the depth of the material and clarity of Spector's vision for his
famed Wall of Sound, whether you've heard these songs hundreds of times or not
at all -- especially because they gain power when grouped together. Many
producers have been credited as the true creative force behind many rock
records, but usually that's hyperbole. In Spector's case, it wasn't, as this set
gloriously proves.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SOME INFO FROM WIKIPEDIA
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Teddy Bears

With three friends from high school, Marshall Lieb, Harvey Goldstein, and singer
Annette Kleinbard, Spector formed a group, The Teddy Bears. During this period,
Spector also began visiting local recording studios, and he eventually managed
to win the confidence of record producer Stan Ross, co-owner of Gold Star
Studios in Hollywood, who began to tutor the young man in record production and
who exerted a major influence on Spector's production style.

By the spring of 1958, Spector and his bandmates had raised enough money to buy
two hours of recording time at Gold Star. With Spector producing, the Teddy
Bears recorded the Spector-penned "Don't You Worry My Little Pet," which helped
them secure a deal with Era Records. At their next session, they recorded
another song Spector had written — this one inspired by the epitaph on Spector's
father's tombstone. Released on Era's subsidiary label, Dore Records, "To Know
Him Is to Love Him" went to #1 on Billboard Hot 100 singles chart, selling over
a million copies by year's end.

Following the success of their debut, the group signed with Imperial Records,
but their next single, "I Don't Need You Anymore," only reached #91. While
several more recordings were released, including an album The Teddy Bears Sing!,
the group never again charted in the Hot 100. The Teddy Bears went their
separate ways in 1959.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Record producer

After the split, Spector's career quickly moved from performing and songwriting
to production. While recording the Teddy Bears' album, Spector had met Lester
Sill, a former promotion man who was a mentor to Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller.
His next project, the Spectors Three, was undertaken under the aegis of Sill and
his partner, Lee Hazlewood. In 1960, Sill arranged for Spector to work as an
apprentice to Leiber and Stoller in New York.

Spector quickly learned how to use a studio. He co-wrote the Ben E. King Top 10
hit "Spanish Harlem", with Jerry Leiber and also worked as a session musician,
most notably playing the guitar solo on the The Drifters' song, "On Broadway".
His own productions during this time, while less conspicuous, included releases
by LaVern Baker, Ruth Brown, and Billy Storm, as well as The Top Notes' original
version of "Twist and Shout".

Leiber and Stoller recommended Spector to produce Ray Peterson's "Corrina,
Corrina," which reached #9 in January 1961. Later, he produced another major hit
for Curtis Lee, "Pretty Little Angel Eyes," which made it to #7.

Returning to Hollywood, Spector agreed to produce one of Lester Sill's acts.
After both Liberty Records and Capitol Records turned down the master of "Be My
Boy" by The Paris Sisters, Sill formed a new label, Gregmark Records, with Lee
Hazlewood and released it. It only managed to reach #56, but the follow-up, "I
Love How You Love Me", was a smash, reaching #5.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Philles Records

In the fall of 1961, Spector formed a new record company with Lester Sill, who
by this time had ended his business partnership with Hazlewood. Philles Records
combined the names of its two founders. Through Hill and Range Publishers,
Spector found three groups he wanted to produce: The Ducanes, The Creations, and
The Crystals. The first two signed with other companies, but Spector managed to
secure The Crystals for his new label. Their first single, "There's No Other
(Like My Baby)" was a success, hitting #20. Their next release, "Uptown", did
even better, making it to #13.

Spector continued to work freelance with other artists. In 1962, he produced
"Second Hand Love" by Connie Francis, which reached #7. In the early '60s, he
briefly worked with Atlantic Records' R&B artists Ruth Brown and LaVerne Baker.
Ahmet Ertegün of Atlantic paired Spector with Broadway star Jean DuShon for
"Talk to Me", the b-side of which was "Tired of Trying", written by DuShon.

Spector briefly took a job as head of A&R for Liberty Records. It was while
working at Liberty that he heard a song written by Gene Pitney, for whom he had
produced a #41 hit, "Every Breath I Take", a year earlier. "He's a Rebel" was
due to be released on Liberty by Vicki Carr, but Spector rushed into Gold Star
Studios and recorded a cover version using Darlene Love on lead vocals. The
record was released on Philles, attributed to The Crystals, and quickly rose to
the top of the charts.

By the time "He's a Rebel" went to #1, Lester Sill was out of the company, and
Spector had Philles all to himself. He created a new act, Bob B. Soxx & the Blue
Jeans, featuring Darlene Love and Bobby Sheen, a singer he had worked with at
Liberty. The group had hits with "Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah" (#8), "Why Do Lovers Break
Each Other’s Hearts?" (#38), and "Not Too Young To Get Married" (#63). Spector
also released solo material by Darlene Love in 1963. In the same year, he
released "Be My Baby" by The Ronettes, which went to #2.

Although predominantly a singles-based label, Philles did release a few albums,
one of which was the perennial seller A Christmas Gift for You in 1963.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Wall of Sound

Spector's trademark during that era was the so-called Wall of Sound, a
production technique yielding a dense, layered effect that reproduced well on AM
radio and jukeboxes. To attain this signature sound, Spector gathered large
groups of musicians (playing some instruments not generally used for ensemble
playing, such as electric and acoustic guitars) playing orchestrated parts —
often doubling and tripling many instruments playing in unison — for a fuller
sound. Spector himself called his technique "a Wagnerian approach to rock &
roll: little symphonies for the kids".

While Spector directed the overall sound of his recordings, he took a relatively
hands-off approach to working with the musicians themselves (usually a core
group that became known as The Wrecking Crew, including session players such as
Hal Blaine, Steve Douglas, Carol Kaye, Roy Caton, Glen Campbell, and Leon
Russell), delegating arrangement duties to Jack Nitzsche and having Sonny Bono
oversee the performances, viewing these two as his "lieutenants".

Spector frequently used songs from songwriters employed at the Brill Building
(Trio Music) and at 1650 Broadway (Aldon Music), such as the teams of Ellie
Greenwich and Jeff Barry, Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, and Gerry Goffin and
Carole King. Spector often worked with the songwriters, receiving co-credit for
compositions.

Spector was already known as a temperamental and quirky personality with strong,
often unconventional ideas about musical and recording techniques. Despite the
trend towards multi-channel recording, Spector was vehemently opposed to stereo
releases, claiming that it took control of the record's sound away from the
producer in favor of the listener. Spector also greatly preferred singles to
albums, describing LPs as "two hits and ten pieces of junk".

The first time Spector put the same amount of effort into an LP as he did into
45s was when he utilized the full Philles roster and the Wrecking Crew to make
what he felt would become a hit for the 1963 Christmas season. A Christmas Gift
for You arrived in stores the day of the assassination of President Kennedy on
November 22, 1963. The somber mood of the country may have contributed to the
album being a flop in its initial release. Despite its initially poor reception,
selections from the album are now Yuletide mainstays on radio stations, and the
album has since been a regular seller during the holiday season.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The mid-Sixties

In 1964, The Ronettes appeared at the Cow Palace, near San Francisco. Also on
the bill were The Righteous Brothers. Spector, who was conducting the band for
all the acts, was so impressed with Bill Medley and Bobby Hatfield that he
bought their contract from Moonglow Records and signed them to Philles. In early
1965, "You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'", became the label's second #1 single.
Three more major hits with the group followed: "Just Once in My Life" (#9),
"Unchained Melody" (originally the B side of "Hung On You") (#4) and "Ebb Tide"
(#5). Despite having hits, Spector lost interest in producing The Righteous
Brothers, and sold their contract and all their master recordings to Verve
Records. However, the sound of The Righteous Brothers' singles was so
distinctive that the act chose to replicate it after leaving Spector, notching a
second #1 hit in 1966 with the Bill Medley-produced, "(You're My) Soul and
Inspiration".

The Spector-produced recording of "Unchained Melody" had a second wave of
popularity 25 years after its initial release, when it was featured prominently
in the 1990 hit movie, Ghost. A re-release of the single re-charted on the
Billboard Hot 100, and went to number one on the Adult Contemporary charts. This
also put Spector (as a producer) back on the U.S. Top 40 charts for the first
time since his last appearance in 1971 with John Lennon's "Imagine", although he
did have U.K. top 40 hits in the interim with The Ramones.

Spector's final signing to Philles was the husband-and-wife team of Ike and Tina
Turner in 1966. Spector considered their recording of "River Deep - Mountain
High", to be his best work, but it failed to go any higher than #88 in the
United States. The single, which was essentially a solo Tina Turner record, was
more successful in Britain, reaching #3.

Spector subsequently lost enthusiasm for his label and the recording industry.
Already something of a recluse, he withdrew temporarily from the public eye,
marrying Veronica "Ronnie" Bennett, lead singer of the Ronettes, in 1968.
Spector emerged briefly for a cameo as a drug dealer in the film Easy Rider, in
1969. He also appeared as himself in an episode of I Dream of Jeannie in 1967.

In 1969, Spector made a brief return to the music business by signing a
production deal with A&M Records. A Ronettes single, "You Came, You Saw, You
Conquered" flopped, but Spector returned to the Hot 100 with "Black Pearl", by
Sonny Charles and the Checkmates, Ltd. The record reached #13.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
INDIVIDUAL TRACKS
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SPANISH HARLEM

Song Review by Thomas Ward

One of the biggest hits of Phil Spector’s early career, “Spanish Harlem” is a
beautifully constructed song, sung magnificently by Ben E. King, yet ironically
in the production is displays a minimal amount of orchestration and is arguably
the barest sounding track the producer ever recorded. As a pop song, it’s
certainly of it’s time, although the lyrics are quite charming – “There is a
rose in Spanish Harlem/A red rose up in Spanish Harlem”. Spector gives the
singer room in the verses, only adding glorious strings in the chorus. As a
production, it’s incredibly mature for someone just out of his teens, and as a
song it’s certainly one of Spector’s most approachable from the beginning of the
producer’s career.

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PRETTY LITTLE ANGEL EYES

Song Review by John Bush

Phil Spector was fresh off his first Top Ten hit production ( "Corrina Corrina"
by Ray Peterson on the Dunes label) when he returned to the same label to
oversee this firecracker of a pop single. A standard four-chord pop song written
by Lee with then-songwriting partner Tommy Boyce (later of Boyce- Hart), "Pretty
Little Angel Eyes" benefitted slightly from Lee's assured teenage vocal, but
more so from the song's ultra-tight groove, a honking sax solo, and the backing
harmonies of the Halos. Released on Dunes in 1961, it climbed to the number
seven spot and was never equalled by Lee, despite recording one more hit with
Boyce, "Under the Moon of Love."

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I LOVE HOW YOU LOVE ME

Song Review by John Bush

The Paris Sisters had been performing and recording since the mid-‘50s with
little success until they stepped into the studio one day to meet a wunderkind
named Phil Spector and exited with one of 1961's most bewitching singles. The
sisters, Priscilla, Albeth, and Sherrell, weren't incredible performers -- their
earlier lack of success was justified -- but Spector proved his genius by
accenting the breathy lead of Priscilla and leaving in a few miscues to lend the
song a winning naivete. This was, of course, no Wall of Sound pounder. Instead,
Spector layered the track with faraway strings and a slowly swinging rhythm
section. Released on Lester Sill's Gregmark label, the single reached the number
five position, just one of several Top Ten notches in Phil Spector's belt during
1961.

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HE'S A REBEL

Song Review by Richie Unterberger

Producer Phil Spector had had a fair amount of success already in the early '60s
before the Crystals issued "He's a Rebel" in 1962. "He's a Rebel," though, was
the record that elevated Spector from one of many middling hitmakers into an
industry phenomenon, also blueprinting the "Wall of Sound" for which he's been
lauded. The record, oddly enough for a girl-group classic that was (naturally)
sung by women, was written by a male star, Gene Pitney, who himself was not
noted as a prolific composer. Spector heard the song on a demo and went to town
on the production, making an already-strong pop/rock song into an anthem. The
track begins with a dramatic drum roll, the brief instrumental intro
establishing an almost martial beat, embellished by layers of percussion and
tinkling piano. As has since been revealed, as on many Crystals tracks, the
vocalists were not the Crystals, and the lead singer was non- Crystal Darlene
Love. On "He's a Rebel," Love sang a tough, soulful, streetwise lyric guaranteed
for youth appeal: the guy who marches to his own beat, and the girl who loves
him all the more for it. Her low vocals were seconded by strong, full soul
backup vocals by the Blossoms. The arrangement was unusually dense for the
period, with two bass players and two guitarists. The song really took off,
though, when it dramatically jumped to a higher key for the chorus, remaining in
that key, in fact, for the rest of the track. The chorus, with its loving
defiance, was instantly memorable, particularly when the backup largely dropped
out for Love to sing, largely on her own, stirring lines in which she asserted
that just because he didn't do what everyone else did, that wasn't any reason
why the couple couldn't share love. That was the cue for the band to re-enter
full-on for a stirring ensemble vocal finish to the chorus, and then for Steve
Douglas to take over with a sax solo. "He's a Rebel" actually doesn't have the
strings that were found in many a Spector production, but the sound was rich and
full, and the single an enormous success, reaching number one. There was brief
concern that sales of the Crystals' "He's a Rebel" single might suffer from a
simultaneous cover version by Vicki Carr, whose arrangement was actually not
dissimilar, though it was stiffer and employed strings.

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HE'S SURE THE BOY I LOVE

Song Review by Thomas Ward

One of the greatest and best known songs of Spector’s career, “He’s Sure The Boy
I Love” is build around one of his finest productions, and is emblematic of much
of the producer’s greatest work. As a song, it’s a simple teen love song, but in
Spector’s hands, it’s transformed into something huge and positively gothic.
Sung with great ambition by Darlene Love, her tremendous, powerful vocal is
still dwarfed by the production – it’s somewhat cliché to say Spector’s “wall of
sound” is huge, but here there’s no other word for it. A great teen pop song,
“He’s Sure The Boy I Love” is one of the producer’s undisputed masterpieces.

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WHY DO LOVERS BREAK EACH OTHERS' HEARTS?

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

Written as a tribute to Frankie Lymon, "Why Do Lovers Break Each Others Hearts"
was the first songwriting collaboration between Phil Spector and Ellie Greenwich
and Tony Powers. The song certainly has a strong Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
feel, not unlike "Why Do Fools Fall in Love." The air of innocence and charm is
abundant throughout the song.

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HEARTBREAKER

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

A swinging, mid-tempo ballad, "Heartbreaker" contains one of the fine vocal
performances from La La Brooks that Phil Spector utilized quite a bit during
this period. Highlighted by a funky, bluesy saxophone break, the song contains
all of the innocence that marked Spector's productions of this era.

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WHY DON'T THEY LET US FALL IN LOVE?


Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

Led by a very distorted (especially for 1963) electric guitar, this song is one
of the earliest vocal performances by Ronnie Spector. Ostensibly a Ronettes
track, it's clear by the billing that Phil Spector had solo stardom planned for
his soon-to-be (and now ex) wife. The yearnings of teenage romance and a desire
to be an adult are at the core of this fine track. It's also the fourth song
that Spector wrote with the Ellie Greenwich/ Jeff Barry team.

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CHAPEL OF LOVE

Song Review by Thomas Ward

Seemingly worn out by it’s use in motion pictures, “Chapel Of Love” is a
charming, warm song – firmly dated in the innocence of the early 1960s, yet
still sounding strangely comforting to modern ears. Without being one of
Spector’s grandest productions, it nevertheless sounds like Spector, it just
doesn’t have the dramatic resonance of ”He’s Sure The Boy I Love” or ”A Fine
Fine Boy”. Indeed, Spector may take the tempo of the song a little too slowly,
and it becomes rather plodding after a while. Regardless of this, it’s still
head and shoulders above most other early 1960s pop music.

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NOT TOO YOUNG TO GET MARRIED

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

Opening with the spontaneous sounds of party chatter, this recording is one of
the earliest examples of utilizing ambient sounds for a pop record. Sung with
great style by Darlene Love, the song is a freewheeling exercise in making a
party record. A jumping tempo, handclaps, and a honking saxophone break
highlight this song, which continues the Spector/ Greenwich/ Barry songwriting
team's themes of serious young romance and the desire to grow up.

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WAIT 'TIL MY BOBBY GETS HOME

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

The simple theme of testing a romance while a lover is away is the subject of
this fine, if simple song. One of the things that makes it an interesting record
is the fact that Phil Spector and is engineering/arrangement team of Larry
Levine and Jack Nitzsche were now achieving a more expansive sound in the
confines of Gold Star Studios. Possibly cut during the sessions for A Christmas
Gift for You, there is a distinctive holiday spirit here, with the classy, pop
piano riffs and chimes and bells. Another fine vocal performance from Darlene
Love, this time as a duet with her sister, Edna Wright.

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ALL GROWN UP

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

Driven by a funky, almost surf guitar, "All Grown Up" is one of the grittier
sides that Phil Spector cut during this period. A driving rhythm and general
explosive atmosphere highlight the track. The song itself is a celebration of
the coming of age for a teenage that can now "go on dates," etc. Such innocence
would soon seem simplistic, yet the overall charm is still infectious. A fine
vocal from La La Brooks rounds out the effort.

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BE MY BABY

Song Review by Jason Ankeny

"Be My Baby" announces its arrival with arguably the most dramatic introduction
in all of rock & roll -- Hal Blaine's drums are the Morse code of the gods --
and somehow just keeps getting better from there; the quintessential Phil
Spector production, it begins as the Wall of Sound but ends up a full-blown Taj
Mahal, a gleaming sonic temple erected in eternal tribute to Ronettes frontwoman
(and the future Mrs. Spector) Veronica Bennett. Hot on the heels of the classic
"Da Doo Ron Ron" and "Then He Kissed Me," "Be My Baby" unveils the complete
scope of Spector's vision: a slow-burn pop symphony, it builds momentum with
each passing verse, propelled by horse-gallop castanets and muted piano figures
until it achieves maximum density in a majestic convergence of vocals, strings,
horns, and thunderclap percussion. That Spector's most grandiose production to
date would serve the least polished vocalist in his stable might seem like
perverse irony, but in truth "Be My Baby" works because of Bennett, not in spite
of her. While never a singer on par with, say, Darlene Love, her voice radiates
pure baby-doll sexuality -- she somehow transforms the sweetly sappy sentiments
of Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich's song into a veritable siren's call (her
"whoa-oh-oh-oh" exclamations, reprised on the brilliant follow-up "Baby, I Love
You," say it all), and the plaintive longing of the lyrics aside, there's never
a moment of doubt that it's she who is the real object of desire here. Although
it's been regularly covered in the years since, the Ronettes' original recording
has never really gone away -- a staple of oldies radio, it's also something of a
fixture on film soundtracks, used most effectively by Martin Scorsese over the
opening credits of his early masterpiece Mean Streets before resurfacing over a
decade later in the smash Dirty Dancing. No less an authority than Brian Wilson
has declared "Be My Baby" the greatest pop record ever made -- no arguments
here.

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A FINE, FINE BOY

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

A blinding, rollicking tempo (not unlike "Da Doo Ron Ron") is the rhythmic
centerpiece here. In a certain way, this is one of the last examples of what
could be the difference between Phil Spector's early and mid period. A honking
saxophone and a tremendous vocal from Darlene Love highlight this simplistic
love song, which is bookended by a charming spoken word recital.

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I WONDER

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

A decidedly Spanish rhythm and melodic shading is one of the unique features of
this fine, early Ronettes cut. As usual, the themes of innocence and teenage
angst are the lyric themes here. One of Phil Spector's greatest talents was
choosing the right artist for the right composition, and in this case he
utilizes Ronnie Spector's pleading, sexy voice to his advantage. You can almost
visualize a teenage girl lying on her bed dreaming and languishing over here
near-future romantic fate. This was a hallmark to many of these records, and it
was rarely bettered than here.

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GIRLS CAN TELL

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

This is a previously unreleased version of "Girls Can Tell" that appears on the
Back to Mono box set. However, when the Ronettes' version surfaced, it was
credited to the Crystals. That bit of confusion out of the way, the song itself
is a breezy bit of early-'60s pop and features one of Jack Nitzsche's finest
string arrangements. The sense of operatic grandeur is one of the highlights of
this song, which is a pop meditation on women's intuition. The chorus is indeed
one of the catchiest of any of Phil Spector's records of its time, making its
belated inclusion on the box set worthwhile.

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LITTLE BOY

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

Featuring the great La La Brooks on lead vocals, "Little Boy" is one of the more
definitive Phil Spector-produced records of this era. A pounding, almost tribal
rhythm and tempo drive the song, and its operatic overtones underline the fact
that Spector described his records as "little symphonies for the kids." Although
not one of Spector's biggest hits, its overall production and song quality
render it as a great example of progressive pop music, circa late 1963.

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HOLD ME TIGHT

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

After Phil Spector visited England in late 1963 (and ended up sharing a plane
with the Beatles on their maiden visit to the U.S. in early 1964), he
immediately went into the studio with designs to cover a Lennon/ McCartney tune.
Utilizing the vocal talents of Vinnie Poncina and Peter Andreoli (who were
Spector songwriting collaborators at the time), dubbing them the Treasures, they
came up with this unusual, but fine cover. The recording is quite an interesting
blending blend of British pop and '50s doo wop, and the result is one of
Spector's more black sounding records of the period.

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(THE BEST PART OF) BREAKIN' UP

Song Review by William Ruhlmann

After topping the charts with their first release, "Be My Baby," in October
1963, the Ronettes peaked outside the Top 20 with their second, "Baby, I Love
You," in February 1964. That single was such an effective example of
producer/co-writer Phil Spector's wall of sound production techniques that its
relative failure, even before the Beatles arrived in America to lead the British
Invasion, boded ill for future releases in the same style. But its follow-up,
"(The Best Part Of) Breakin' Up" was another mid-tempo pop symphony, brilliant
but increasingly out of step with the marketplace. The week that it peaked just
inside the Top 40 in May 1964, there were ten singles ranked above it either by
the Beatles or another newly emerged British act, but even without them it would
not have matched the success of "Baby, I Love You," much less "Be My Baby." To
the extent you could extrapolate upon pop music trends just by watching the
progress of Phil Spector-related singles, you'd have to say the British Invasion
simply took advantage of a sea change already occurring. And yet, what a
wonderful record this was. The song itself, written by Spector, Pete Andreoli,
and Vini Poncia, revealed a previously unexamined truism about romance (the best
part of breakin' up "is when you're makin' up") and had a typically catchy tune.
Veronica Bennett (later to be Ronnie Spector) sang it winningly, suspended above
the massive instrumentation that meshed beautifully. In retrospect, on
compilations issued decades later, "(The Best Part Of) Breakin' Up" seemed like
just another in Spector's long line of masterpieces. But when it was released,
the time for such works had already passed, and the song never achieved a
significant life beyond its initial recording.

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SOLDIER BABY (OF MINE)

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

Another dramatic, almost operatic record from Phil Spector, "Soldier Baby of
Mine" captures all of the romantic yearning of a long-lost loved one in just
under three minutes. One of the more beloved sides of the era, it seems strange
(and indicative) that a song like this could succeed just prior to the
escalation of protest over the Vietnam war. This certainly highlights the
general air of innocence that was a hallmark of Spector's records. An overall
doo wop atmosphere highlights this piece, which is an excellent example of the
Ronettes' ability as group singers.

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STRANGE LOVE

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

A somewhat unusual Phil Spector-produced track. Although this is merely
conjecture, the wordless, singsong vocal melody is remarkably reminiscent of the
theme song from the film Lolita, "Lolita Ya-Ya." The fact that the film came out
during the same year and the subject matter of the movie and the title of the
song makes it seem like there is a connection. Aside from that, the song is one
of the period classics, with a lighter feel than some of the other Spector-
produced sides of the period. Containing an almost lullaby feeling, it's one of
the more well-crafted dark classics of the time.

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STUMBLE AND FALL

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

A biting incitement of a future breakup and its repercussions, this song is yet
another one of the more definite Phil Spector-produced records of the era that,
unfortunately, wasn't a major hit. With the same locomotive tempo that propelled
such hits as "Da Doo Ron Ron," "Stumble and Fall" had a slightly more elegant,
almost jazzy feel than that landmark record. Impeccably sung by the always
soulful Darlene Love, the song's unique tempo changes and general momentum make
it a bit of a minor classic.

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WHEN I SAW YOU

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

One of Phil Spector's most reserved productions ever, "When I Saw You" is also
one of the few recorded songs that he wrote by himself. A simple, jazzy blues,
the song is based in the trio jazz format, and the only other instrumentation is
the superb orchestral arrangement by Jack Nitzsche. A pleading tale of the
longing of love, its sparse feel makes it one of the best songs that Ronnie
Spector ever sang. Given the fact that Phil and Ronnie were in the throws of
early romance, it's particularly effecting. One of the standouts on the album
The Fabulous Ronettes Featuring Veronica as well as the Back to Mono box set.
Chilling and beautiful, all at the same time.

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SO YOUNG

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

Retracing his doo wop leanings, Phil Spector put his all into this classic '50s
ballad. Even the songwriter, William "Prez" Tyus, commented that this was the
best version of the song. A bluesy ballad statement that focuses on a sentiment
that was common to Spector-produced sides, it focuses on the passion of preteen
romance. Brian Wilson produced and arranged another excellent version for the
Beach Boys Today album, but this version is indeed the most effective.

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DO I LOVE YOU?

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

Probably the apex of the Spector/ Poncina/ Andreoli songwriting team, "Do I Love
You" barely scraped the Top 40, which is a sad fact indeed. A funky and elegant
guitar/keyboard riff propels the song. Lyrically, its focus is common to many of
the Phil Spector-produced sides, being about preteen romance and devotion. The
overall grandeur and elegance of the melody is undeniable, making it one of the
finest Spector-produced obscurities ever. A worthy inclusion on the Wall of
Sound box set.

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KEEP ON DANCING

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

Capitalizing on the Ronettes' impeccable ability to bring out the best in ballad
statements, '50s doo wop/ R&B chord changes highlight this fine song, which
unfortunately was a bit outdated for the 1964 pop airwaves. Nevertheless, the
general elegance (highlighted by Jack Nitzsche's awesome string arrangement) is
undeniable. The pleading, desperate leaning of the sad teen angst of the lyric
is underlined by the excellence of the Ronettes' fabulous group vocals.

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YOU BABY

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

A subtle, tribal rhythm is the basis for this fabulous Ronettes track, which is
one of the transitional records in Phil Spector's mid-'60s record productions.
As usual, Ronnie Spector's pleading, kittenish vocals underline the passion of
the lyric thrust, which focuses on teenage love and its innocent devotion.
Although this version is certainly definitive, the Lovin' Spoonful did an
excellent version on their Daydream album in early 1966, underlining the
influence that Spector's records had on more "progressive" rockers. As a strange
twist of fate, Spector himself was briefly considering signing the Spoonful in
early 1965.

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WOMAN IN LOVE (WITH YOU)

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

As usual, Phil Spector was ahead of the current recording trends, in terms of
"sound," and this is a great example. As far as the song goes, it's a slightly
doo wop-oriented slice of pop, but the production has the chiming quality of
some of the bigger folk-rock hits of 1965. Some ornate and elaborate
orchestration by arranger Jack Nitzsche highlights this great track, which
contains some excellent use of modulation, also ahead of its time.

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WALKING IN THE RAIN

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

One of the last major chart hits for the Ronettes, "Walking in the Rain" is also
a landmark record for another reason. Containing some authentic sound effects of
thunder and lightning by engineer Larry Levine (which rightfully earned him a
Grammy nomination) made this a very important record for the time. The overall
elegance of this fine love song also was on a par with any record from 1965,
even though it was released in 1964. This record sort of marked the end of Phil
Spector's 1964-1965 period and opened the door for his more complex productions
for Ike & Tina Turner and the Righteous Brothers.

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BORN TO BE TOGETHER

Song Review by William Ruhlmann

"Born to Be Together," which was released in January 1965 as the Ronettes' sixth
single on Philles Records, was a love song written by the Brill Building team of
Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil with Phil Spector, who produced the record. It
followed "Walking in the Rain," which had been the group's fifth consecutive Top
40 hit and had marked an uptick in their chart success without coming close to
the popularity of their only really big hit, 1963's "Be My Baby." As its title
implied, "Born to Be Together" was a song in which the singer declared and
described her affection for her lover, culminating in the chorus, which made the
love seem destined. Arranger Jack Nitzsche seemed to be knitting together
several different songs, as the tempo changed and instrumentation shifted from a
spare accompaniment behind Veronica Bennett's lead vocal to a full-scale
representation of the legendary Spector wall of sound, with its pummeling drums,
soaring strings, and brightly played horns. Unfortunately, this was a style that
was passing out of popularity even as Spector was recording it. The single,
billed for the first time to " the Ronettes Featuring Veronica," didn't even
cross the halfway mark of the Top 100 singles charts, and later Ronettes singles
fared even worse. "Born to Be Together" remains an interesting example of a wall
of sound production, but it is rarely heard outside of a Ronettes hits
compilation.

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JUST ONCE IN MY LIFE

Song Review by William Ruhlmann

After the arrival of the Beatles and the rise of Motown in 1964, writer/producer
Phil Spector started to have trouble scoring hits with his stable of girl groups
like the Crystals and the Ronettes on his Phillies Records label. But in the
fall of 1964, he came up with a new hitmaking team when he made "You've Lost
That Lovin' Feelin'" with the Righteous Brothers, for whom the term " blue-eyed
soul" was invented. Though another term, " power ballad," wasn't coined until
the 1980s, it might have been used to describe "You've Lost That Lovin'
Feelin'," a song performed at a slow tempo that nevertheless built to powerful
crescendos. The song topped the charts in December 1964, and it wasn't until
March 1965 that Phillies issued its follow-up, "Just Once in My Life." For this
song, Spector, who had teamed with the Brill Building team of Barry Mann and
Cynthia Weil for the previous song, co-wrote with another Brill Building duo,
Gerry Goffin and Carole King. The song was a boy's plea to a girl to stay with
him when everything else in his life was going badly. The recording repeated
many of the same elements from "You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'": It began
slowly with a dramatic vocal by baritone Bill Medley, joined on the chorus by
tenor Bobby Hatfield. The arrangement continually built up, as the tempo
quickened, and then subsided and slowed, with each peak getting higher as the
singers emoted soulfully. "Just Once in My Life" was not as compelling a song as
"You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'," but it was in the same mold, and that was
enough to get it into the Top Ten (as, indeed, the next three Righteous Brothers
singles -- "Unchained Melody," "Ebb Tide," and "[You're My] Soul and
Inspiration" -- also would do). Its similarity to its predecessor has hurt its
long-term success, no doubt, as has its title, which is perhaps a little to
close to that of Stevie Wonder's 1968 hit "For Once in My Life," which went on
to become a much-recorded standard. Among the few covers of "Just Once in My
Life," the most prominent is the one by the Beach Boys that served as the
closing track on their 1976 comeback album, 15 Big Ones, with producer Brian
Wilson, always a Phil Spector admirer, closely following the original
arrangement.

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IS THIS WHAT I GET FOR LOVING YOU?

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

Listening to this song, which was recorded in 1965, the listener can see why the
music of Phil Spector was 180 degrees for the new, hip pop marketplace. A '50s-
ish pop ballad with some elegant Burt Bacharach overtones, it sounded old, at
the time. This, however, takes nothing away from the quality of the song, which
has aged gracefully. One of the finest Ronettes obscurities that graces the Back
to Mono box set.

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LONG WAY TO BE HAPPY

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

One of the last tracks that Darlene Love cut with Phil Spector, "Long Way to Be
Happy" is another great production of the day that didn't chart. A big,
pulsating pop song, the literate lyric stance, always a hallmark of the Goffin/
King team, is the focus here. The burden and pain of romance, as well as the
road there, are handled with the usual sense of craft and elegance from the
songwriting team. Musically, the Burt Bacharach-influenced melody is the focus
of the music, with the usual King shifts in melody.

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(I LOVE YOU) FOR SENTIMENTAL REASONS

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

A classic pop ballad previously recorded by Sam Cooke, this song was a perfect
choice for Bobby Hatfield's honey-laden tenor voice. The B-side of "Ebb Tide,"
it has a swirling, echo-enhanced arrangement -- one of the Phil Spector
trademarks -- as the core of this version. Loaded with all of the blue-eyed soul
power of the Righteous Brothers at their best, this record is indeed one of
their finest.

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EBB TIDE

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

Inspired by the fact the two previous versions of "Unchained Melody (by Rou
Hamilton and Al Hibber) were followed by versions of this song, Phil Spector
chose this song for the Righteous Brothers as a follow-up. It was indeed sound
thinking, only marred by the litigation that Spector and the group were going
through at the time. Reaching number five in the U.S. pop a charts (and Top Ten
in the U.K.), the song has all of the sustained power of "Unchained Melody," as
well as the hallmarks of the Spector/ Righteous trademarks of the period.

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THIS COULD BE THE NIGHT

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

A truly great experiment in the Phil Spector production cannon. After failing to
commit to signing and producing the Lovin' Spoonful and the Young Rascals,
Spector finally invested in the obvious folk-rock electric politics of the
period with the Modern Folk Quartet. This song, co-written by Spector and Harry
Nilsson, is almost a Beach Boys version of folk-rock; it's a rousing, rich, and
romantic pop classic with all of the buoyancy of the period. Used as the theme
song from the T.A.M.I. film (one of the first rock movies, really), it captures
a sense of optimism that was undeniable at the time.

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PARADISE

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

Opening with an early use of ambient sounds (birdcalls and rivers), this
fabulous Ronettes ballad was one of their great late sides. A great love ballad
of escapism and release, this song (co-written by Harry Nilsson is probably as
close as the Ronettes came to folk-rock. A big and swirling production surrounds
the cut, and Ronnie Spector's kittenish vocals are the epitome of romanticism.

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RIVER DEEP, MOUNTAIN HIGH

Song Review by Jason Ankeny

Although Ike and Tina Turner's "River Deep, Mountain High" captures the
Wagnerian majesty of Phil Spector's wall of sound production ethic at its
deliriously grandiose peak, the record also signaled the end of an era; pulling
out all the stops to create his magnum opus, Spector left himself no margin for
error, and when the single failed at pop radio, the producer's artistic heyday
was over. Originally recorded in 1966, "River Deep, Mountain High" was Spector's
last-ditch attempt to return to the charts he dominated just months earlier. No
longer collaborating with the Righteous Brothers, his last hitmaking vehicle,
the producer suffered flop after flop, and in light of the stunning advances
made by recent recordings from the Beatles and the Beach Boys, it seemed pop
music was in danger of passing him by for good. Written by the team of Jeff
Barry and Ellie Greenwich -- the authors of past Spector classics like "Da Doo
Ron Ron," "Be My Baby," and "Then He Kissed Me" -- "River Deep, Mountain High"
forsakes the puppy-love pathos of the team's previous hits to achieve a
cathartic intensity rooted in R&B; the melody, actually a composite of three
different unfinished songs, veers dangerously close to complete collapse, yet
holds together seemingly through sheer force of will. Operatic excess simply
unlike anything which came before it, the completed record employed close to two
dozen session musicians and cost some 22,000 dollars, at the time an
unbelievable price tag for an entire album, let alone a single; still, it was
perhaps too radical -- whispers that "River Deep, Mountain High" was too black
for white radio (and vice versa) aside, the song's commercial failure also spoke
to massive shifts in consumer tastes, as well as industry-wide changes making it
harder and harder for independent releases to crack the mainstream. Its
indifferent response crushed Spector, who shut down his Philles label soon
after; he would score later hits, including records with ex- Beatles John Lennon
and George Harrison, but never again return to his creative peak. Both watershed
and Waterloo, "River Deep, Mountain High" is nevertheless extraordinary by any
measure -- the symphonic pop masterpiece even Spector's past landmarks only
hinted at, it remains the apotheosis of the singular wall of sound aesthetic, a
cohesive sonic force unmatched before or since. And Tina Turner's performance is
electrifying -- for all the great singers under Spector's previous employ, none
could possibly have topped her heartbreaking power. Everyone from Motown
perennials the Four Tops to synth pop duo Erasure has covered the song since,
but no one has come close to matching the grandeur of Spector's original
production. When Celine Dion performed "River Deep, Mountain High" live on
television's Late Show With David Letterman, Spector was sufficiently impressed
to consider a comeback, entering the studio with Dion soon after. The producer's
legendary eccentricities and tyrannical demands quickly proved too much for the
singer to handle, however, and she fled the project, although another version of
the song was eventually issued on her 1996 Live à Paris album.

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I'LL NEVER NEED MORE THAN THIS

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

This soulful, R&B-soaked ballad was the follow-up to the classic "River Deep,
Mountain High." Almost unbelievably, it actually comes very close to matching
the power and fury of that classic record. With an almost operatic power, this
song certainly utilizes all of Tina Turner's incredible voice. An important
record in the hil Spector canon, it was indeed a worthy inclusion on the Back to
Mono box set.

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LOVE LIKE YOURS (DON'T COME KNOCKING EVERYDAY)

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

Another attempt at following-up "River Deep, Mountain High," this Motown-related
side was transformed into an operatic, blasting piece in the hands of Phil
Spector and Tina Turner. Although many critics have labeled this recording as
overdone, there is a powerful romanticism to it, making it one of Spector's
finer later-period sides.

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I WISH I NEVER SAW THE SUNSHINE

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

Easily one of the most underrated Ronettes sides, this fabulous, unreleased (at
the time) ballad made the greatest use of Ronnie Spector's kittenish voice. A
bittersweet heartbreaking song, it has the usual Spector trademark echo-laden
production that makes it sound like it's as deep as a wishing well. A catchy,
major-key chorus earmarks it as a commercial hit, had it been released at the
time. One of the highlights of the Back to Mono box set, this is Ronnie
Spector's favorite Ronettes' record.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

YOU CAME, YOU SAW, YOU CONQUERED

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

The final, Phil Spector-produced Ronettes side, "You Came, You Saw, You
Conquered" was record shortly after Spector's 1969 "comeback" period with the
Checkmates. Easily one of the more outdated sides for the period, it certainly
sounds like a 1959 hit record. Whatever Spector's reasons for doing this, it
sill has aged remarkably well.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

BLACK PEARL

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

This fine, Motown-influenced ballad was Phil Spector's "comeback" record in
early 1969. Inspired by the premise of the film For the Love of Ivy (about an
African-American housekeeper in a white household), it has a strong period
charm. In hindsight, the heavy, sleek production sheen makes it one of the
finest productions of the era. A cross between white supper-club soul and R&B,
the song made the most of Sonny Charles' pinched, soulful tenor.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

LOVE IS ALL I HAVE TO GIVE

Song Review by Matthew Greenwald

A heavy, Righteous Brothers-inspired production surrounds this fine, bittersweet
ballad. Phil Spector was indeed searching for a unique mixture of Motown-
influenced pop and authentic R&B, and he found it here. The production is, of
course, a powerful blend of Spector's over-the-top, echo-laden sound and white
soul. Elegant strings and mandolins create a unique atmosphere here, making it
one of his most exploratory records, ever. It ends the Back to Mono box set in
grand style, too.

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EXTRACT FROM EAC LOGS
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Exact Audio Copy V0.99 prebeta 4 from 23. January 2008

EAC extraction logfile from 7. June 2009, 0:07

Various / Phil Spector: Back to Mono (1958-1969) [disc 1]

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Read mode : Secure
Utilize accurate stream : Yes
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Read offset correction : 102
Overread into Lead-In and Lead-Out : No
Fill up missing offset samples with silence : Yes
Delete leading and trailing silent blocks : No
Null samples used in CRC calculations : Yes
Used interface : Installed external ASPI interface
Gap handling : Appended to previous track

Used output format : User Defined Encoder
Selected bitrate : 1024 kBit/s
Quality : High
Add ID3 tag : Yes
Command line compressor : F:Archivos de programaExact Audio
CopyFLACFLAC.EXE
Additional command line options : -6 -V -T "ARTIST=%a" -T "TITLE=%t" -T
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%d

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Exact Audio Copy V0.99 prebeta 4 from 23. January 2008

EAC extraction logfile from 7. June 2009, 0:38

Various / Phil Spector Back to Mono (1958-1969) [disc 2]

Used drive : HL-DT-STDVD-RAM GSA-H55N Adapter: 0 ID: 0

Read mode : Secure
Utilize accurate stream : Yes
Defeat audio cache : Yes
Make use of C2 pointers : No

Read offset correction : 102
Overread into Lead-In and Lead-Out : No
Fill up missing offset samples with silence : Yes
Delete leading and trailing silent blocks : No
Null samples used in CRC calculations : Yes
Used interface : Installed external ASPI interface
Gap handling : Not detected, thus appended to
previous track

Used output format : User Defined Encoder
Selected bitrate : 1024 kBit/s
Quality : High
Add ID3 tag : Yes
Command line compressor : F:Archivos de programaExact Audio
CopyFLACFLAC.EXE
Additional command line options : -6 -V -T "ARTIST=%a" -T "TITLE=%t" -T
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%d

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Exact Audio Copy V0.99 prebeta 4 from 23. January 2008

EAC extraction logfile from 7. June 2009, 1:15

Various / Phil Spector: Back to Mono (1958-1969) [disc 3]

Used drive : HL-DT-STDVD-RAM GSA-H55N Adapter: 0 ID: 0

Read mode : Secure
Utilize accurate stream : Yes
Defeat audio cache : Yes
Make use of C2 pointers : No

Read offset correction : 102
Overread into Lead-In and Lead-Out : No
Fill up missing offset samples with silence : Yes
Delete leading and trailing silent blocks : No
Null samples used in CRC calculations : Yes
Used interface : Installed external ASPI interface
Gap handling : Appended to previous track

Used output format : User Defined Encoder
Selected bitrate : 1024 kBit/s
Quality : High
Add ID3 tag : Yes
Command line compressor : F:Archivos de programaExact Audio
CopyFLACFLAC.EXE
Additional command line options : -6 -V -T "ARTIST=%a" -T "TITLE=%t" -T
"ALBUM=%g" -T "DATE=%y" -T "TRACKNUMBER=%n" -T "GENRE=%m" -T "COMMENT=%e" %s -o
%d

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Exact Audio Copy V0.99 prebeta 4 from 23. January 2008

EAC extraction logfile from 7. June 2009, 1:36

Various / A Christmas Gift For You

Used drive : HL-DT-STDVD-RAM GSA-H55N Adapter: 0 ID: 0

Read mode : Secure
Utilize accurate stream : Yes
Defeat audio cache : Yes
Make use of C2 pointers : No

Read offset correction : 102
Overread into Lead-In and Lead-Out : No
Fill up missing offset samples with silence : Yes
Delete leading and trailing silent blocks : No
Null samples used in CRC calculations : Yes
Used interface : Installed external ASPI interface
Gap handling : Appended to previous track

Used output format : User Defined Encoder
Selected bitrate : 1024 kBit/s
Quality : High
Add ID3 tag : Yes
Command line compressor : F:Archivos de programaExact Audio
CopyFLACFLAC.EXE
Additional command line options : -6 -V -T "ARTIST=%a" -T "TITLE=%t" -T
"ALBUM=%g" -T "DATE=%y" -T "TRACKNUMBER=%n" -T "GENRE=%m" -T "COMMENT=%e" %s -o
%d

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