Other

The Doors Morrison Hotel (Perception Remaster) EAC FLAC RePoPo

  • Download 5x Faster
  • Download torrent
  • Direct Download
  • Rate this torrent +  |  -
The Doors Morrison Hotel (Perception Remaster) EAC FLAC RePoPo

Free and Direct Download with Usenet 300GB+ free


Torrent info

Name:The Doors Morrison Hotel (Perception Remaster) EAC FLAC RePoPo

Total Size: 460.48 MB

Magnet: Magnet Link

Seeds: 0

Leechers: 0

Stream: Watch Online @ Movie4u

Last Updated: 2015-08-31 04:51:58 (Update Now)

Torrent added: 2008-10-28 05:53:27




Torrent Files List


COVERS (Size: 460.48 MB) (Files: 9)

 COVERS

  The Doors - Morrison Hotel - Back.jpg

385.62 KB

  The Doors - Morrison Hotel - Booklet (1-2).jpg

356.07 KB

  The Doors - Morrison Hotel - Booklet (2-2).jpg

285.62 KB

  The Doors - Morrison Hotel - Front.jpg

172.20 KB

 The Doors - Morrison Hotel (Perception Remaster) [EAC-FLAC] [RePoPo].cue

2.83 KB

 The Doors - Morrison Hotel (Perception Remaster) [EAC-FLAC] [RePoPo].flac

459.28 MB

 The Doors - Morrison Hotel (Perception Remaster) [EAC-FLAC] [RePoPo].log

3.76 KB

 The Doors - Morrison Hotel (Perception Remaster) [EAC-FLAC] [RePoPo].nfo

15.37 KB

 Torrent downloaded from Demonoid.com.txt

0.05 KB
 

tracker

leech seeds
 

Torrent description

*******************************************************************************
The Doors - Morrison Hotel (Perception Remaster)
*******************************************************************************

The Doors - Morrison Hotel (Perception Remaster)

01.- Roadhouse Blues [04:04]
02.- Waiting For The Sun [04:00]
03.- You Make Me Real [02:53]
04.- Peace Frog [02:49]
05.- Blue Sunday [02:13]
06.- Ship Of Fools [03:08]
07.- Land Ho! [04:10]
08.- The Spy [04:17]
09.- Queen Of The Highway [02:47]
10.- Indian Summer [02:35]
11.- Maggie M'Gill [04:25]
12.- Talking Blues ** [00:59]
13.- Roadhouse Blues (11.4.69 Takes 1-3) ** [08:47]
14.- Roadhouse Blues (11.4.69 Take 6) ** [09:27]
15.- Carol (11.4.69) ** [00:55]
16.- Roadhouse Blues (11.5.69 Take 1) ** [04:32]
17.- Money Beats Soul (11.5.69) ** [01:05]
18.- Roadhouse Blues (11.5.69 Takes 13-15) ** [06:20]
19.- Peace Frog (False Starts & Dialogue) ** [02:00]
20.- The Spy (Version 2) ** [03:48]
21.- Queen Of The Highway (Jazz Version) ** [03:36]


** = Bonus tracks, exclusive for this release

CD Ripped using Exact Audio Copy. Converted to FLAC using dbPowerAmp. This album is part of the "Perception" box set, which enclosed all six studio
albums from The Doors, with bonus DVDs and a enhanced audio, specifically remastered for this box.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Review by Richie Unterberger (allmusicguide)

The Doors returned to crunching, straightforward hard rock on Morrison Hotel, an album that, despite yielding no major hit singles, returned them to critical favor with hip listeners. An increasingly bluesy flavor began to color the songwriting and arrangements, especially on the party'n'booze anthem "Roadhouse Blues." Airy mysticism was still present on "Waiting for the Sun," "Queen of the Highway," and "Indian Summer"; "Ship of Fools" and "Land Ho!" struck effective balances between the hard rock arrangements and the narrative reach of the lyrics. "Peace Frog" was the most political and controversial track, documenting the domestic unrest of late-'60s America before unexpectedly segueing into the restful ballad "Blue Sunday." "The Spy," by contrast, was a slow blues that pointed to the direction that would fully blossom on L.A. Woman.

Originally released as part of the completed recorded works 2006 box set Perception, this deluxe edition of Morrison Hotel is a double-disc set containing one CD featuring a newly remastered version of the album with bonus tracks and a DVD with a 5.1 Surround mix, bonus video footage, and a photo gallery. Given that the Doors catalog was remastered just seven years before this box, the sonics of these 2006s remasters are noticeable but not radically different -- the kind of subtle remastering that is significant to audiophiles who know this music intimately. This reissue contains a whopping ten bonus tracks: four of these may be alternate takes of "Roadhouse Blues," but there's the brief snippets of "Talking Blues" and "Money Beats Soul," a really ragged and short version of Chuck Berry's "Carol," false starts of "Peace Frog," and alternate versions of "The Spy" and "Queen of the Highway." On the video side, there are music videos of "Roadhouse Blues" and "Wild Child." Apart from the genuine alternate takes, most of the bonus material feels like scraps, but they don't hurt this deluxe edition, which ultimately lives up to its title: this is the best-sounding, best-presented reissue of this album yet.


About the album (from Wikipedia)

Morrison Hotel (sometimes referred to as Hard Rock Cafe from the title of the first side of the LP, whose second side is titled Morrison Hotel) is The Doors' fifth album. It was released in 1970. After their experimental work The Soft Parade was not as well received as anticipated, the group went back to basics and back to their roots. On this album, there is a slight steer toward blues, which would be fully explored by the band on their next album, L.A. Woman. The strategy worked; even though no major hit singles were drawn from the album, Morrison Hotel reestablished The Doors as favorites of the critics, and when they followed with L.A. Woman the next year, they were rewarded with two more US Top 20 hits.

Additional musicians include harmonica whiz G. Puglese (aka John Sebastian) and blues master Lonnie Mack on bass.

The cover photo was taken at the actual Morrison Hotel located at 1246 South Hope Street in Los Angeles. The band asked the owners if they could photograph the hotel and they declined, so the band went inside when nobody was looking and took the photograph.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ROADHOUSE BLUES

“Roadhouse Blues” opens up the Doors fifth studio LP with the band firing on all cylinders. Although Morrison Hotel was touted as a ‘blues’ album, this tune is one of the few tracks that fully bear that statement to fruition. Likewise, Jim Morrison had not yet lost his erotic bravado and magnetic arrogant swagger -- which he indeed exudes throughout the album, especially here. Augmenting the quartet are legendary blues guitarist Lonnie Mack -- who is uncharacteristically sporting a bass on this recording -- and some mean Chicago-style harp blowin’ from one G. Puglese -- who is better known as former Lovin’ Spoonful leader John B. Sebastian.

Morrison’s lyrics -- while perfectly matched to the song’s bar room/college dorm atmosphere -- seem atypically negligible at first. However, below that veneer lies some of his most authentically sexually charged images -- true to the spirit of both Morrison and the blues. Lines such as “Yeah, the back of the roadhouse/they got some bungalows/And That’s For The People who Like To Go Down Slow”, and the prototypical blues howl “You’ve got to roll, roll, roll/You’ve got to thrill my soul, all right” simultaneously hearken back to the basics of blues, yet retain a unique sense of Morrison’s inimitable poetry. Instrumentally, between Robbie Krieger’s stinging guitar inflections and accents, and winding through Ray Manzarek’s full throttle piano pounding, the cohesive nature of the Doors as a musical unit may have been arguably equalled, but never surpassed their efforts on “Roadhouse Blues”.

The song quickly became a performance favourite and was revived for the series of post-Miami concerts as well. The archival Live in Detroit (Cobo Hall, 05/08/1970) (2000) features a fiery version as does the Bright Midnight: Live in America sampler which contains an incendiary performance from Boston.

The song took two days to record (November 4th-5th, 1969), producer Paul A. Rothchild striving for perfection. Several takes from these sessions were included on the new 2006 remastered album. Rothchild can be heard instructing the band members on their musicianship, notably when he exclaims to Robbie Krieger about his introductory guitar riff that "we're going to the roadhouse, Robbie, not the bathroom!" Surprisingly, he does not comment on Morrison, who is apparently intoxicated, "going into full blues singer mode" in the words of engineer Bruce Botnick, improvising and simultaneously flubbing several lyrics and repeating the blues phrase "Money beats soul every time". The sessions only took off on the second day, when resident Elektra guitarist Lonnie Mack joined in on bass and harmonicist John Sebastian (appearing under the pseudonym G. Puglese out of loyalty to his recording contract or to avoid affiliation with The Doors after the Miami controversy) joined in on the sessions and Ray Manzarek switched from his Wurlitzer electric piano to a tack piano (the same used on The Beach Boys "Good Vibrations"). One classic moment is when Morrison shouts "Do it, Lonnie! Do it!" when Mack rips off the solo. Mack was playing bass on that song and had borrowed Krieger's guitar to develop some blues guitar lines. Kreiger copied some of Mack's lines in later takes. No one really knows whose take made it on the final cut. An interesting fact about this song is that Morrison has used few Nepalese words in his lyrics.The song took two days to record (November 4th-5th, 1969), producer Paul A. Rothchild striving for perfection. Several takes from these sessions were included on the new 2006 remastered album. Rothchild can be heard instructing the band members on their musicianship, notably when he exclaims to Robbie Krieger about his introductory guitar riff that "we're going to the roadhouse, Robbie, not the bathroom!" Surprisingly, he does not comment on Morrison, who is apparently intoxicated, "going into full blues singer mode" in the words of engineer Bruce Botnick, improvising and simultaneously flubbing several lyrics and repeating the blues phrase "Money beats soul every time". The sessions only took off on the second day, when resident Elektra guitarist Lonnie Mack joined in on bass and harmonicist John Sebastian (appearing under the pseudonym G. Puglese out of loyalty to his recording contract or to avoid affiliation with The Doors after the Miami controversy) joined in on the sessions and Ray Manzarek switched from his Wurlitzer electric piano to a tack piano (the same used on The Beach Boys "Good Vibrations"). One classic moment is when Morrison shouts "Do it, Lonnie! Do it!" when Mack rips off the solo. Mack was playing bass on that song and had borrowed Krieger's guitar to develop some blues guitar lines. Kreiger copied some of Mack's lines in later takes. No one really knows whose take made it on the final cut. An interesting fact about this song is that Morrison has used few Nepalese words in his lyrics.


PEACE FROG

It was released on vinyl in February 1970 by Elektra/Asylum Records and produced by Paul Rothchild. The song blends seamlessly into the next track on the album, "Blue Sunday", so radio stations often play the two songs consecutively.

This funky, kinetic song is one of those tracks that will constantly amaze. On this classic Doors track, Morrison touches on points of unrest, "the blood on the streets" that overtakes different cities: Chicago, Venice, "fantastic L.A.," and New Haven. New Haven? Well, New Haven was one of the cities where Morrison was arrested in 1969. Despite the title, the Doors not surprisingly don't offer any solutions to the problems raised here. But then again if they did they might have come off weird. In fact, "Peace Frog," like most Doors songs, has the group all but reveling in disarray. After the polyrhythmic attack comes a kind of meditation. As the music quiets, Morrison begins the passage, "Indians scattered on dawn's highway, bleeding to death, ghosts crowd the child's fragile eggshell mind," which recalls an incident in his childhood that affected him deeply. Like many Doors songs, no matter how far out Morrison's lyrics were, the band was there to support him. Robby Krieger in particular does great terse and bluesy lines throughout. Ray Manzarek's eerie keyboards add to the chaos as usual.

"Peace Frog" was originally called "Abortion Stories"; guitarist Robby Krieger gave the song its more tame title, "Peace Frog." The bloody images (There's blood in the streets, it's up to my ankles/There's blood on the streets, it's up to my knee, etc.) originated, like many songs of The Doors, from the poetry of Jim Morrison, including "Not to Touch the Earth" on the album Waiting for the Sun and "The WASP (Texas Radio and the Big Beat)" on L.A. Woman.

The line "Indians scattered on dawn's highway bleeding/Ghosts crowd the young child's fragile eggshell mind" originates from his poem, "Ghost Song," that describes an event that occurred when he was young. As Morrison described it in An American Prayer:
“Me and my — mother and father — and a grandmother and a grandfather — were driving through the desert, at dawn, and a truck load of Indian workers had either hit another car, or just — I don't know what happened — but there were Indians scattered all over the highway, bleeding to death."

"So the car pulls up and stops. That was the first time I tasted fear. I musta' been about four — like a child is like a flower, his head is floating in the breeze, man.”

The opening scene of Oliver Stone's movie The Doors portrays this memory of Morrison's.

The phrase "Blood in the streets in the town of New Haven" was Morrison's reference to the police in New Haven, Connecticut. He had been arrested there while on stage for taunting them. Since the concert was abruptly ended after Morrison's abrupt departure, a riot ensued that spilled from the New Haven Arena (since razed) into the streets.

This song was being played by many US troops during the invasion of Cambodia in 1970. The Pol Pot regime adapted this song while it invaded Cambodia in 1975


SHIP OF FOOLS

Is a poetic musical paradox. Contrasting the track’s buoyant syncopated rhythms are Jim Morrison’s lyrics, occupying the familiar terrain between creation and demise. As musicians, John Densmore (drums), Robbie Krieger (guitar), Ray Manzarek (keyboards) and former Don Ellis Orchestra member and session stalwart Ray Neopolitan (bass) immediately lock into a tight, jazzy percolating riff -- which is abandoned for a 2/4 beat once Morrison’s vocals begin.

As the ‘60s draw to a close, Morrison captures a somewhat apocalyptic overview regarding the conclusion of the era -- “The human race was dying out/no one left to scream and shout”. He balances that with the hope and prospect of seeking new horizons -- “People walking on the moon” -- only to reinforce his initial nihilistic observations with the line “smog will get you pretty soon.”

The second verse is an apt poetic reflection of the ‘60s counterculture -- “Everyone was hanging out/Hanging up and hanging down/Hanging in and holding fast”. Once again, Morrison counteracts with the optimistic line “Hope our little world will last”.

After a brief improvisational interlude the band once again corral behind Morrison as he unifies some obvious religious and secular imagery in the verse which begins “Along came Mr. Goodtrips/Looking for a new ship”.

The Doors performed “Ship Of Fools” sporadically throughout their sets in 1970. The concert arrangement sticks pretty close to the original. However, the instrumental break is extended, allowing the trio a chance to connect with some highly innovative jazz progressions. Inspired live readings can be found on both the “Live In New York” disc of the Doors Box Set (1997), as well as the Live in Detroit (2000) archival release.


QUEEN OF THE HIGHWAY

It is the ninth, and third-to-last track on that album. The lyrics were written by lead singer Jim Morrison and are believed to be about his girlfriend Pamela Courson, with the lines "She was a princess / Queen of the Highway" referring to her, the "He was a Monster / Black dressed in leather" being a description of Jim Morrison himself, and the "I hope it can continue / Just a little while longer" lines being perhaps, as suggested in No One Here Gets Out Alive, a "sardonic reference to their troubled love".

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Info taken from allmusicguide and wikipedia
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

related torrents

Torrent name

health leech seeds Size
 

comments (0)

Main Menu