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Darby O'Gill and the Little People (1959) DVDRip (SiRiUs sHaRe)

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Darby O'Gill and the Little People (1959) DVDRip (SiRiUs sHaRe)

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Name:Darby O'Gill and the Little People (1959) DVDRip (SiRiUs sHaRe)

Total Size: 711.57 MB

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Stream: Watch Online @ Movie4u

Last Updated: 2016-07-10 00:31:32 (Update Now)

Torrent added: 2009-09-03 08:18:10



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Darby O'Gill and the Little People (1959) VHSRip (SiRiUs sHaRe).avi (Size: 711.57 MB) (Files: 3)

 Darby O'Gill and the Little People (1959) VHSRip (SiRiUs sHaRe).avi

711.56 MB

 Darby O'Gill and the Little People (1959).rtf

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 FAQ README.txt

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Darby O'Gill and the Little People (1959)

A frisky old storyteller named Darby O'Gill is desperately seeking the proverbial pot of gold. There's just one tiny thing standing in his way: a 21-inch leprechaun named King Brian. In order to get the gold, Darby must match his wits against the shrewd little trickster- which proves no small task indeed!

Albert Sharpe ... Darby O'Gill
Janet Munro ... Katie O'Gill
Sean Connery ... Michael McBride
Jimmy O'Dea ... King Brian
Kieron Moore ... Pony Sugrue
Estelle Winwood ... Sheelah Sugrue
Walter Fitzgerald ... Lord Fitzpatrick
Denis O'Dea ... Father Murphy
J.G. Devlin ... Tom Kerrigan
Jack MacGowran ... Phadrig Oge
Farrell Pelly ... Paddy Scanlon
Nora O'Mahoney ... Molly Malloy

Director: Robert Stevenson

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0052722/

Runtime: 93 mins

Codecs: DivX 5 / MP3

Please Note: The audio quality is not great when listened to in stereo. I suggest using the right channel in mono for the best quality! I am sorry that I do not have this film in any other decent format.

I saw this movie on TV as a child, and the scenes of the banshee and the death coach scared and impressed me so much, I carried the memory of them all my life. When I was an adult and saw it on video, I was astonished to find that the scenes are STILL impressive and creepy!

Considering how sophisticated special effects have become since 'Darby O'Gill' was made in 1959, that's quite a tribute to the moviemaking skills of the day. The scenery is lovely, the actors skilful and wholeheartedly into their work, the music catchy and delightful, and really there's nothing not to like in this movie. The duels between Darby and his nemesis, King Brian, are wonderfully funny, as each tries to outsmart the other.

This is a truly enchanting film for all ages. It takes the viewer to the small Irish village of Rushcullen in County Kerry where not much happens except to one person, Darby O'Gill.

Darby is a lovable old caretaker for the local Lord of the Manor whom the Lord jokes retired years ago but never told anyone. Darby's wanderings up to the ruins above the village have led him into contact with the 'little people' ruled by the likable but cunning King Brian.

The battle of wits between Darby and King Brian are the central theme running through the film but the subplots surrounding Darby's beautiful daughter Katie (played by the English actress Janet Munro who tragically died at only 38) and the competition between her suitor's, Sean Connery and Kieron Moore keep the older viewers interest. Add to this a bit of drama surrounding a death carriage and a scary banshee and you have a film which works on even more levels.

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This is something of a forgotten gem of the family film genre. With tales of leprechaun's and banshee's all told through the wonderful west coast brogue, it doesn't fail to captivate.

It's somewhat idealised version of Irish life in the 1920's is also a delight. Okay, not all Irish people lived in thatched cottages, tipped their caps to the local priest or went to the pub to catch up on the craig, but a lot did.

As family films go this is right up there with Mary Poppins and The Lion KingThe village characters are all well-drawn and likeable personalities. Pony Sugrue seems more 'American' than the others, but then, he's not supposed really to fit in in the village, and his punishment at the end is an enjoyable comeuppance. Favourite scenes - the banshee and death coach at the end, as mentioned, and all the leprechauns dancing under the fairy mountain then riding their little white horses out into the night as Darby plays them a wild tune on his fiddle. Don't be put off by the date on this movie; it's as good now as the day it was made.

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As a lad I well remember the kind of campaigns Walt Disney used to publicize his films. He used all the available outlets he had such as his Mickey Mouse Club show or the Walt Disney Wonderful World of Color television shows. If Walt Disney could have worked it out, he'd have plugged Darby O'Gill and the Little People on Zorro.

I remember Disney on one of his shows having a formal meeting with King Brian of Knocknasheega to sign over screen rights to the story of the leprechauns. It was all done with a kind of serious pomp that would impress a kid with Disney and Jimmy O'Dea who played the leprechaun king, Brian Conners.

According to the Films of Walt Disney by Leonard Maltin, Disney had it in mind to do an Irish story for over 15 years before Darby O'Gill was released. In fact when he saw the original Broadway production of Finian's Rainbow, he had his leading man in mind in the person of Albert Sharpe.

Sharpe's Darby O'Gill is a gamekeeper on the grounds of Lord Fitzpatrick who in his declining years spends more time at the local pub, regaling the patrons with his tales of encounters with the leprechauns. As Walter Fitzgerald who plays Lord Fitzpatrick says, Darby retired a couple of years ago without telling me. So he's hired himself a young new gamekeeper, an outsider from Dublin named Michael McBride played by a pre-James Bond Sean Connery.

Connery's a decent chap though and he'll give Sharpe time enough to vacate the gamekeeper's gate cottage. Besides Connery's taken a liking to Darby's daughter Katie in the person of winsome Janet Munro.

The film alternates and then blends the story of Connery's courtship of Munro with the person of her other suitor, the town bully played by Kieron Moore and Sharpe's adventures with the leprechauns. King Brian tricks him a couple of times, but Darby captures him by getting him drunk and keeping him out until daylight when he has no powers.

If Darby O'Gill had been made by someone other than Disney probably Barry Fitzgerald would have played Darby. Sharpe certainly has the elfin charm of Fitzgerald's Michaeleen O'Flynn from The Quiet Man. And because he was not a movie name, he worked a lot cheaper for Disney, always a consideration in The Magic Kingdom.

The special effects are really good here considering this was the age before computer generated graphics. Enough to give even a twelve year old a fright with the appearance of the banshee and the costa bower, the death coach.

The answer to a movie trivia question is this film if it is ever asked whether Sean Connery sang in a movie. It's in fact him singing, My Little Irish Girl, both he and Janet Munro sing it alone and duet it for the finale. No dubbing, in fact Sean Connery cut a 45 rpm record of it back in the day. Probably worth a fortune if you could find one.

Janet Munro did a few films for Disney. She was a wholesome lass in his films, very appealing and her death at too young and age was a real tragedy. Either Disney didn't spot anything in Sean Connery or Connery was too smart to be tied down to a long term contract to that studio. Connery after Dr. No premiered spent the next dozen years or so trying to prove both artistically and financially that he was capable of more than James Bond.

But it sure would be fascinating to speculate on what turn Sean Connery's career would have taken if I had starred in a half a dozen or so Disney features. Can you imagine him trying to escape that kind of typecasting?

Darby O'Gill and the Little People is a children's film and I think it still has charm a-plenty even for today's generation who might be skeptical about leprechauns.

* Walt Disney started planning for this movie in the 1940s. After World War II, Disney sent several artists to Ireland for background material.

* Walt Disney visited Ireland in December of 1948 and publicly announced the production of this film, then entitled simply, "The Little People". It would be another decade before the film was actually made.

* Walt Disney had seen Albert Sharpe in a stage production of "Finian's Rainbow" in the 1940s and kept him in mind for the role of Darby. By the time he began casting this film a decade later, Sharpe had retired. He was able to convince Sharpe to come out of retirement.

* Walt Disney was initially hoping to cast 'Barry Fitzgerald' in the dual roles of Darby O'Gill and King Brian. Fitzgerald reportedly declined due to his advanced age (although his eventual replacement as Darby, Albert Sharpe, was three years his senior). Disney regretted the loss of Fitzgerald in the lead role, and blamed the film's disappointing box-office performance partly on this loss.

* When Michael doesn't kiss Katie, King Brian (Jimmy O'Dea) exclaims "And him a Dublin man!" Jimmy O'Dea was born and raised in Dublin.

* Albert Sharpe did not know how to play the fiddle, so two professional musicians were hired to create the illusion. One handled the bowing and the other handled the frets while Sharpe kept his hands out of the way.

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