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Of Human Bondage (1934) DVDRip Dual Esp Eng (SiRiUs sHaRe)

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Of Human Bondage (1934) DVDRip Dual Esp Eng (SiRiUs sHaRe)

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Name:Of Human Bondage (1934) DVDRip Dual Esp Eng (SiRiUs sHaRe)

Total Size: 703.89 MB

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Stream: Watch Online @ Movie4u

Last Updated: 2010-12-13 01:57:43 (Update Now)

Torrent added: 2009-09-02 12:51:48



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FAQ README.txt (Size: 703.89 MB) (Files: 3)

 FAQ README.txt

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 Of Human Bondage (1934) DVDRip Dual Esp-Eng (SiRiUs sHaRe).avi

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Torrent description

Of Human Bondage (1934)

Abandoning artistic ambitions, sensitive and club-footed Philip Carey enrolls in medical school and falls in love with illiterate waitress Mildred Rogers. She rejects him, runs off with a salesman and returns unmarried and pregnant. Philip gets her an apartment and they become engaged. Mildred runs off with another medical student. Philip takes her back again when she returns with her baby. She wrecks his apartment and burns the securities he needs to pay tuition. He gets a job as a salesman, has surgery on his foot, receives an inheritance, and returns to school where he learns Mildred is dying.

Leslie Howard ... Philip Carey
Bette Davis ... Mildred Rogers
Frances Dee ... Sally Athelny
Kay Johnson ... Norah
Reginald Denny ... Harry Griffiths
Alan Hale ... Emil Miller
Reginald Sheffield ... Cyril Dunsford
Reginald Owen ... Thorpe Athelny
Desmond Roberts ... Dr. Jacobs

Director: John Cromwell

Runtime: 83 mins

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0025586/

Codecs:

Video : 567 MB, 959 Kbps, 25.0 fps, 608*464 (4:3), XVID = XVID Mpeg-4,
Audio : 67 MB, 114 Kbps, 48000 Hz, 2 channels, 0x55 = MPEG Layer-3, VBR,

This movie has dual audio:

Audio 1: Espanol
Audio 2: English

Please check the FAQ for details on how to play the correct stream!

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After 21 movies and three years of working in Hollywood Bette Davis finally got a role she claimed as her own and which put her as a force to be reckoned with. As Mildred Rogers, Davis burst forth with a completely unsympathetic role of a slutty waitress who becomes the target of Leslie Howard\'s affections, and already eager to sink her teeth into a role like this, she had no qualms of the awful things her character was meant to do throughout the course of the film and the awful transformation she would undergo. It also has been widely noted that her performance here, one of the few things that makes this slightly uneven movie watchable, has been the one to remember even after two remakes and the scenes where she rips into Howard have made cinema history.

At circa 85 minutes, the story moves at a nice pace, telling the story of Philip Carey (Howard) as his life crosses that of the destructive Mildred Rogers over and over again.

Howard and Davis\' chemistry is all but non-existent -- Davis sustained in an interview much later in life she personally didn\'t care much for Howard\'s iciness towards her and that helped her act even worse (in character) towards him as Mildred. All the same, the two seem awkward with one another; their scenes together remain stiff, only salvaged by the ferocious acidity Davis brings to her lines and her own nervous presence. Then again, Cromwell\'s direction has a certain stiltedness about itself that fails to come through at times -- he tries to fill in some space (whenever Davis is not there) with dissolves and montages indicating the passing of time (a calendar superimposed over a changing Frances Dee). All much in the style back then. This was before technicalities and complicated camera angles came into being, and in essence, the visual story is a simplified, bare essentials translation of the Somerset Maugham\'s novel -- which is saying a lot, since at 600 pages, \"Of Human Bondage\" would have been indeed hard to film even then.

Storywise, it feels that Philip Carey may be something of a glutton for punishment, since there is no discernible, sexual attraction between he and Mildred and to compound that, Mildred never hides her displeasure from the get-go. Howard\'s performance never seems to go through much external emotion -- his eyes are constantly sad, his expression never veers too far away from lost (he could almost be a distant cousin to William Hurt in \"The Accidental Tourist\" -- dejected, hurt, and absolutely passive), but this is possibly a part of his character and the reason he fails to see that other women (played by Kay Johnson and Frances Dee) are making themselves vulnerable to unrequited affections. Interestingly, Johnson\'s Norah, once she realizes Carey will never fall for her, is the one who sums the story up with her observation that people are bound to other people -- she is bound to Carey as Carey is bound to Mildred, and Mildred herself is bound to Miller (or men who fit the role of provider). In her short but memorable scene, she\'s the one who holds the essence of the story\'s moral.

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Every motion picture Bette Davis stars in is worth experiencing. Before Davis co-stars with Leslie Howard in \"Of Human Bondage,\" she\'d been in over a score of movies. Legend has it that Davis was \'robbed\' of a 1935 Oscar for her performance as a cockney-speaking waitress, unwed mother & manipulative boyfriend-user, Mildred Rogers. The story goes that the AFI consoled Davis by awarding her 1st Oscar for playing Joyce Heath in \"Dangerous.\" I imagine Davis\' fans of \"Of Human Bondage\" who agree with the Oscar-robbing legend are going to have at my critique\'s contrast of the 1934 film for which the AFI didn\'t award her performance & the 1936 film \"Dangerous,\" performance for which she received her 1st Oscar in 1937.

I\'ve tried to view all of Bette Davis\' motion pictures, TV interviews, videos, advertisements for WWII & TV performances in popular series. In hindsight, it is easy to recognize why this film, \"Of Human Bondage,\" gave Davis the opportunity to be nominated for her performance. She was only 25yo when the film was completed & just about to reach Hollywood\'s red carpet. The public began to notice Bette Davis as a star because of her performance in \"Of Human Bondage.\" That is what makes it her legendary performance. But, RKO saw her greatness in \"The Man Who Played God,\" & borrowed her from Warners to play Rogers.

I\'m going to go with the AFI, in hindsight, some 41 years after their astute decision to award Davis her 1st Best Actress Oscar for \"Dangerous,\" 2 years later. By doing so, the AFI may have been instrumental in bringing out the very best in one of Hollywood\'s most talented 20th century actors. Because, from \"Of Human Bondage,\" onward, Davis knew for certain that she had to reach deep inside of herself to find the performances that earned her the golden statue. Doubtless, she deserved more than 2 Oscars; perhaps as many as 6.

\"Dangerous\" provides an exemplary contrast in Davis\' depth of acting characterization. For, it\'s in \"Dangerous\" (1936) that she becomes the greatest actor of the 20th century. Davis is so good as Joyce Heath, she\'s dead-center on the red carpet. Whereas in \"Of Human Bondage,\" Davis is right off the edge, still on the sidewalk & ready to take off on the rest of her 60 year acting career.

Perhaps by not awarding her that legendary Oscar in 1935, instead of a star being born, an actor was given incentive to reach beyond stardom into her soul for the gifted actor\'s greatest work.

It is well known that her contemporary peer adversary was Joan Crawford; a star whose performances still don\'t measure up to Davis\'. Even Anna Nicole Smith was a \'star\'. Howard Stern is a radio host \'star\', too. Lots of people on stage & the silver screen are stars. Few became great actors. The key difference between them is something that Bette Davis could sense: the difference between the desire to do great acting or to become star-struck.

Try comparing these two movies as I have, viewing one right after the other. Maybe you\'ll recognize what the AFI & I did. Davis was on the verge of becoming one of the greatest actors of the 20th century at 25yo & achieved her goal by the time she was 27. She spent her next 50 plus years setting the bar so high that it has not been reached . . . yet.

Had the AFI sent her the message that she\'d arrived in \"Of Human Bondage,\" Davis\' life history as a great actor may have been led into star-struck-dom, instead.

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If Jack Warner had had his way, Bette Davis would have wound up playing all kinds of molls in various Warner Brothers gangster films. Of Human Bondage was a significant milestone in her career because she proved to everyone, including herself, that she was capable of so much more.

Like Frank Sinatra with Angelo in From Here to Eternity, Davis knew she was born to play the slatternly amoral Mildred from W. Somerset Maugham\'s classic novel. Though she rarely used false accents in her movie career after this, she got the Cockney speech pattern down perfect. Davis will keep you riveted to your seat with her performance her. And what a scandal it was that she wasn\'t nominated. I suspect some intrigue was at work there, possibly the brothers Warner who didn\'t want her to get a swelled head. Also she\'d gotten this break through role at another studio so they weren\'t going to make a dime on it.

Two years later Leslie Howard and Bette Davis would team up again in The Petrified Forest. But what a contrast between the dreamy naive Gabby and Mildred. The same with the male leads. In The Petrified Forest, Leslie Howard is the world weary blase Alan Squire. In Of Human Bondage, Howard\'s Philip Carey is a shy man with a deep inferiority complex because of his club foot. He clings to Mildred because even though she\'s degraded him, he feels he\'ll never find another attachment again.

For both the leads Of Human Bondage represented a considerable stretching of considerable talents. The two later screen versions are markedly inferior to this one.

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# The film that made Bette Davis a genuine star

# Bette Davis fully expected to be nominated for an Oscar for this, her breakthrough performance in films. When she was denied an official nomination, there was an attempt to make her a \"write-in\" candidate, a practice now barred by the Academy.

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