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My little Chickadee (1940) DVDRip (SiRiUs sHaRe)

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My little Chickadee (1940) DVDRip (SiRiUs sHaRe)

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Name:My little Chickadee (1940) DVDRip (SiRiUs sHaRe)

Total Size: 699.52 MB

Magnet: Magnet Link

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Stream: Watch Online @ Movie4u

Last Updated: 2010-09-22 08:57:30 (Update Now)

Torrent added: 2009-08-31 14:14:25




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FAQ README.txt (Size: 699.52 MB) (Files: 3)

 FAQ README.txt

2.92 KB

 My little Chickadee (1940) DVDRip (SiRiUs sHaRe).avi

699.51 MB

 My little Chickadee (1940).rtf

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Torrent description

My little Chickadee (1940)

Rightly suspected of illicit relations with the Masked Bandit, Flower Belle Lee is run out of Little Bend. On the train she meets con man Cuthbert J. Twillie and pretends to marry him for \"respectability.\" Arrived in Greasewood City with his unkissed bride, Twillie is named sheriff by town boss Jeff Badger...with an ulterior motive. Meanwhile, both stars inimitably display their specialties, as Twillie tends bar and plays cards, and Flower Belle tames the town\'s rowdy schoolboys...

Mae West ... Flower Belle Lee
W.C. Fields ... Cuthbert J. Twillie
Joseph Calleia ... Jeff Badger
Dick Foran ... Wayne Carter
Ruth Donnelly ... Aunt Lou
Margaret Hamilton ... Mrs. Gideon
Donald Meek ... Amos Budge
Fuzzy Knight ... Cousin Zeb
Willard Robertson ... Uncle John
George Moran ... Milton, Twillie\'s Indian confederate
Jackie Searl ... Schoolboy (as Jack Searl)
Fay Adler ... Mrs. \'Pygmy\' Allen
Gene Austin ... Saloon musician
Russell Hall ... Candy

Director: Edward F. Cline

Runtime: 83 mins

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0032828/

Codecs:

Video : 664 MB, 1156 Kbps, 25.0 fps, 512*384 (4:3), XVID = XVID Mpeg-4,
Audio : 34 MB, 60 Kbps, 48000 Hz, 1 channels, 0x55 = MPEG Layer-3, CBR,

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Mae West and W. C. Fields were fantastic together, in spite of or their reportedly mutual loathing each other. Fields was at the top of his game here, and Mae West, in spite of her age and build was absolutely lovely. I really must see some of her earlier stuff, before the Hays Office made all films suitable for six-year-bolds. It was a bit incongruous to see Margaret Hamilton in a role here, when she will always be the Wicked Witch of the West. Some memorable lines from West and Fields throughout, and West\'s continuous streams of double entendres were a lot of fun. Also cute to see each of them say the other\'s signature line to each other at the end.

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You could call it \"slapstick\" at its best. They don\'t make them like W C Fields and Mae West anymore. Is that a good thing? Probably. Any imitations could hardly live up to their special brand of comedy. That episode on the train where they get acquainted -- \"It is not good for man to be alone\" quoth he, from the Bible at that. \"Yeah, it\'s not much fun for a woman either,\" says she. \"Do you think it possible for us to be alone together?\" he asks. \"Quite possible,\" is her reply. Who can resist a smile at that dialog!

By the way, for one scene how they could get that billy goat to lie down in bed under blankets, I\'ll never know! There\'s also a scene of a young girl coming into the bar slightly tipsy and I\'m sure it\'s a young Celeste Holmes but there are no credits to verify this. I wonder if anyone else has noticed this?

Flower Belle (Mae West) is burning the midnight oil with \"The Bandit,\" who is masked of course. She also encounters a naive editor (Dick Foran) and conquers that territory too to some extent. Well, for Flower Belle it\'s all in a day\'s work, you might say. Townsfolk are up in arms and intent on finding the Masked Bandit. Along the way they make W C Fields their sheriff but that doesn\'t solve anything. Meanwhile down at the saloon...

This movie with Mae is the one I like best.

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My Little Chickadee is like a home movie W.C. Fields and Mae West just happened to make in their spare time, on the studio lot, back in 1940. The budget was not as ample as Miss West\'s er, well anyway, it\'s a pretty big picture but not that big. The dialogue is better than the film, which is frankly an amateurish mess. Both stars were past their prime when they made this western parody, and both seem a little tired, in general, and with one another, in their scenes together. They\'re much better when reciting the dialogue, which they worked on together (ah, to have been a fly on the wall during their script conferences). Maybe they spent all their energy on the writing. There certainly isn\'t much in their performing. For all its flaws, the movie has some hilarious moments, such as Fields\' suggestion that he has \"some definite pear-shaped ideas\" he would like to discuss with Miss West.

Movie censorship was at its peak when this one was made. Fields and West had been two of the shining lights of early talkies, and the advent of the Production Code in the mid-thirties set them both back professionally, especially Miss West, who was the prime cause of it. Since they couldn\'t quite give this movie their all, due to the extreme censorship of the time, one has to continually read between the lines. There\'s a lot there, though not as much as I think they imagined there was. The film is an heroic effort none the less, if by today\'s standards rather quaint.

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# As he leaves at the end of the film, Cuthbert J. Twillie (W.C. Fields) says to Flower Belle, \"Why don\'t you come up and see me sometime?\", a reference to Mae West\'s famous line in an earlier film, She Done Him Wrong (1933).

# On lunch break one day, W.C. Fields went to his dressing room to start on a new bottle of whiskey he had saved for that purpose. Apparently someone beat him to it, as the bottle had been opened and about half of it had been drunk. Fields immediately ran outside and roared to the crew, \"Who took the cork out of my lunch?\"

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